Format:
Book
Author:
Title:
Edition:
First hardcover edition.
Publisher, Date:
New York, NY : The Mysterious Press, an imprint of Grove Atlantic, 2019.
Description:
288 pages ; 24 cm
Summary:
"From the New York Times bestselling author Thomas Perry, "who can be depended upon to deliver high-voltage shocks" (Stephen King), comes a nail-biting race against death as a young burglar realizes she must solve a string of murders, or else become the next victim Elle Stowell is a young woman with an unconventional profession: burglary. But Elle is no petty thief--with just the right combination of smarts, looks, and skills, she can easily stroll through ritzy Bel Air neighborhoods and pick out the perfect home for plucking the most valuable items. This is how Elle has always gotten by. She is good at it, and she thrives on the thrill. But after stumbling upon a grisly triple homicide while stealing from the home of a wealthy art dealer, Elle discovers that she is no longer the only one sneaking around. Somebody is searching for her. As Elle realizes that her knowledge of the murder has made her a target, she races to solve the case before becoming the next casualty, using her breaking-and-entering skills to uncover the truth about exactly who the victims were and why someone might have wanted them dead. With high-stakes action and shocking revelations, The Burglar will keep readers on the edge of their seats as they barrel towards the heart-racing conclusion" -- Provided by publisher.
Genre:
LCCN:
2018027585
ISBN:
9780802129000 (hardcover)
System Availability:
1
Current Holds:
0
Control Number:
204002
Call Number:
F Per
Course Reserves:
0
# System items in:
0
Availability
Author Notes
Thomas Perry is the bestselling author of over twenty novels, including the critically acclaimed Jane Whitefield series, Forty Thieves , and The Butcher's Boy , which won the Edgar Award. He lives in Southern California.
First Chapter or Excerpt
There was esoteric knowledge to being a burglar--broad areas that took some thought and skill. There was choosing the house, entering the house, and finding the items that were worth taking. Elle Stowell was good at all three. Elle was strong but small, so she couldn't carry a seven-foot television out of a house if she'd wanted to. It didn't matter because the real prizes were all small and dense--money, watches, jewelry, gold, guns, and collections--and usually they were to be found in or near the master bedroom suite. Some of the things she found in bedroom hiding places that fit this description were revealing but not for her to take: secret cell phones for calling lovers, second sets of identification, bugout kits, or drugs. Her small size helped her. She looked like a person who would be out running at dawn in a rich neighborhood, so she didn't worry people who saw her. There was a certain irony to this, because the same qualities made her a fearsome burglar. She could enter a house in dozens of ways that were impos-sible for a large man. She could easily crawl into a house through a dog door or take the glass slats out of a louvered window and slither inside. Both openings were common and neither was ever wired for an alarm. Excerpted from The Burglar by Thomas Perry All rights reserved by the original copyright owners. Excerpts are provided for display purposes only and may not be reproduced, reprinted or distributed without the written permission of the publisher.
Fiction/Biography Profile
Characters
Elle Stowell (Female), Burglar, Independent, Smart; beautiful; skilled at breaking-and-entering
Genre
Fiction
Mystery
Suspense
Thriller
Topics
Young women
Burglary
Wealthy lifestyles
Art dealers
Murder
Stalking
Search for truth
Setting
California - West (U.S.)
Time Period
2000s -- 21st century
Large Cover Image
Trade Reviews

  Publishers Weekly Review

Burglar Elle Stowell, the whip-smart, fearless protagonist of this uneven standalone from Edgar winner Perry (The Bomb Maker), comes from a family of thieves. She approaches every job analytically and is meticulous in her planning. But when she breaks into an L.A. mansion and finds three dead bodies-one male art gallery owner and two affluent married women-naked on a bed in the master bedroom, she becomes the target of a group of professional killers. As the killers' search for her intensifies and the body count rises, the diminutive burglar must uncover the reason why the gallery owner and women were murdered before she becomes the next casualty. The first part of this tight narrative, which is equal parts mystery and thriller, is virtually un-put-downable. But the story starts to unravel in the second part, when numerous plot holes become apparent. In addition, the weak ending will leave readers less than satisfied. Perry fans will hope for a return to form next time. Agent: Mel Berger, WME. (Jan.) c Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.

  Booklist Review

*Starred Review* As we've noted before, Perry writes very well about smart people, whichever side of the law they happen to be on: he shows them thinking, and that process of observing a mind at work, putting together a plan and then improvising on it, proves as compelling as any action scene, although Perry is plenty good at those, too. In his latest novel, the smart person being examined is a burglar, Elle Stowell, a young woman whose carefully designed appearance and lithe frame allow her both to blend in as she cases neighborhoods in tony Beverly Hills and Bel Air and to easily scale whatever drainpipe or climbing vine to gain access to the second floors of mansions. It's all going swimmingly until Elle finds three naked and very dead bodies in the bedroom of a home she was in the act of robbing. Elle skedaddles, but it quickly becomes apparent that the killers know about her and are eager to tie up any loose ends. So the thinking begins, as Elle tracks the murderers as they track her. What she uncovers an elaborate fine-art scam proves almost as fascinating as Elle's remarkable ability to put herself into and then extract herself from harm's way. Nobody drives a narrative like Perry; sure, he knows how to stomp on the gas pedal and negotiate the curves, but, best of all, he does that while dispensing unfailingly interesting information about stuff we've never bothered to think about, which is one more reason we can't get enough of Perry's smart people.--Bill Ott Copyright 2018 Booklist

  Kirkus Review

In case you've forgotten, Perry (The Bomb Maker, 2018, etc.) reminds you that it takes a thief to catch a killer.Elle Stowell has robbed a lot of houses, but her discovery at the home of retired financial services officer Nick Kavanagh, owner of the Kavanagh Gallery, is a first: the naked corpse of Kavanagh, together with those of socialite Anne Satterthwaite Mannon and Hollywood director's wife Valerie McGee Teason, huddled together in the host's bed, each of them shot in the head. Even more bizarre, a digital movie camera at the crime scene has recorded everything from Kavanagh's original propositioning of the two women to Elle's entrance 12 hours later. What to do? Since "Elle was both good in intention and bad at carrying out good intentions," she neither destroys the memory card nor brings it to the LAPD but anonymously mails them a copy from which she's excised her own image and keeps a copy of the undoctored card herself to prove that she arrived on the scene long after the murders because she thinks that the worst thing that could happen to her is getting arrested. Sure enough, her very next job is interrupted by some peopleshe's not sure whoshe hears walking around the house, and her plan to join a friend on a long-distance vacation till things cool down ends with things considerably heated up. By that time, however, Elle's figured out that the biggest threat to her safety isn't the police but the killer whose handiwork she stumbled on. Instead of trying to solve the murders in order to prove her own innocence, she now has a much more compelling reason to figure out who's got her in their sights: turning them over to the authorities before they can kill her too.All the relentless drive of Perry's tales of concealment specialist Jane Whitefield (Poison Flower, 2012, etc.) but there's a less compelling logic behind both the burglar's actions and the murderer's. Copyright Kirkus Reviews, used with permission.
Summary
From the New York Times bestselling author Thomas Perry, "who can be depended upon to deliver high-voltage shocks" (Stephen King), comes a new thriller about an unlikely burglar--a young woman in her 20s--who realizes she must solve a string of murders, or else become the next victim <br> <br> Elle Stowell is a young woman with an unconventional profession: burglary. But Elle is no petty thief--with just the right combination of smarts, looks, and skills, she can easily stroll through ritzy Bel Air neighborhoods and pick out the perfect home for plucking the most valuable items. This is how Elle has always gotten by--she is good at it, and she thrives on the thrill. But after stumbling upon a grisly triple homicide while stealing from the home of a wealthy art dealer, Elle discovers that she is no longer the only one sneaking around. Somebody is searching for her.<br> <br> As Elle realizes that her knowledge of the high-profile murder has made her a target, she races to solve the case before becoming the next casualty, using her breaking-and-entering skills to uncover the truth about exactly who the victims were and why someone might have wanted them dead. With high-stakes action and shocking revelations, The Burglar will keep readers on the edge of their seats as they barrel towards the heart-racing conclusion.
Librarian's View
Book
2019

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